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Knowledge Levels and Practices of First Year University of Zimbabwe Students Regarding Prevention of Sexually Transmitted Infections and Human Immune Virus

Theresa Mhininga, Christine Kasu, Gladys Mugadza

Abstract


Sexually Transmitted Infections are infections transmitted through sexual activity or behavior. Most University students are between the ages of 15-24 (most commonly 18-21), which has been found to be the group that is most susceptible to new sexually transmitted infections. This study sought to determine the knowledge levels and levels of practices of first Year non-medical undergraduate University of Zimbabwe students aged 18-21 years regarding the prevention of sexually transmitted infections including the Human Immune Virus. Materials and Methods: A descriptive survey research design was used utilizing simple random sampling a form of probability sampling and 50 participants were selected into the study. Data was collected using a questionnaire which was divided into 3 sections. Data was analysed using Social Packaging for Social Sciences version 20. Data was presented in the form of tables. Results: Forty-three (86%) of the participants had high knowledge levels whereas 7 (14%) of the participants had moderate levels of knowledge. No one had low levels of knowledge regarding the prevention of STIS including Human Immune Virus. On the levels of practices 4(8%) of the participants had high levels of practices, 7(14%) had moderate levels of practices and 39(78%) of the participants had low levels of practices regarding the prevention of sexually transmitted infections including Human Immune Virus. Discussion: Majority of the participants had high levels of knowledge regarding the prevention of sexually transmitted infections including Human Immune Virus. Generally information on sexually transmitted infections and Human Immune Virus is well spread country wide through different means. However, the levels of practices were low due to unknown causes. Conclusion: Knowledge levels regarding the prevention of sexually transmitted infections including Human Immune Virus is high however the study revealed that the knowledge is not being put into practice.

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References


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