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Urinary Schistosomiasis among Primary School Pupils in Abudu Edo State

Aminaho, Ehianu Maynard

Abstract


The study examined urinary schistosomiasis among primary school pupils in Abudu Edo state.  The study objectives were to determine the prevalence of urinary schistosomiasis among primary school pupils based on gender, class in school and parental occupation as well as ascertain the risk factors for schistosomiasis. Descriptive cross sectional survey design was adopted in the study. The study population included 160 primary school pupils out of which 114 were selected using the purposive sampling techniques. Sample size determination was done using Taro Yamane’s formula. Urine samples were collected from the study subjects and analyzed in parasitological laboratory using standard filtration technique. Urine sample collections were carried out from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm to ensure yield at maximum levels.  A structured questionnaire was used to collect information on the socio-demographic characteristics of the study subjects.  Statistical analysis of data from field survey was done using descriptive statistics and results were presented in tables. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software version 23 was employed in the data analysis process.  Results revealed that 36.8% prevalence of schistosomiasis among primary school pupils in Abudu community of Orhionmwon Local Government Area of Edo State. However, the P-values of 0.33 and 0.37 showed that there was no significant difference in the prevalence of schistosomiasis among primary school pupils based on gender (sex); there was a significant difference in the prevalence of schistosomiasis among primary school pupils based on class in school (P<0.05) as prevalence of schistosomiasis was higher among primary school pupils in class 1-3, there was a significant difference in the prevalence of schistosomiasis among primary school pupils based on class parental occupation (P<0.05), prevalence of schistosomiasis was higher among primary school pupils whose parents were into fishing, the risk factors for schistosomiasis include unhygienic water sources for drinking, non sanitary latrines, bathing in rivers and canals, not wearing shoes to flowing or stagnant water sources , swimming and playing in unhygienic sources. The study concludes that there is a growing prevalence of urinary schistosomiasis among primary school pupils in the area of study. The need for health education and related campaign on the preventive measures for schistosomiasis was recommended.

 


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References


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