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An Explorative Study to Assess the Cultural Practices associated with Childbearing Processes among Postnatal Mothers admitted in a Selected Hospital of Berhampur Ganjam Odisha

Suchita Rani Jena

Abstract


Background: Cultural practices during childbearing processes are still prevalent among communities. Even though these practices do not have scientific value, people still adhere to them for various reasons. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) 2018, under Goal-3, Good Health and Well-being, is aimed at reducing under five mortality to at least as low as 25 per 1000 live births and to reduce the maternal mortality rate to less than 70 deaths per 100000 live births by 2030. The newborns account for a growing number of under five deaths. Aim: This study was aimed to assess the cultural practices associated with childbearing processes among postnatal mothers. Subject and Method: An Explorative study was conducted among postnatal mothers admitted in Maternity and Gyneic units of a selected hospital Berhampur Ganjam Odisha. Sample size was 180, selected through purposive sampling technique. Data collected by using semi-structured interview schedule related to demographic variables such as age, religion, educational qualification of the mother and her husband, occupation of mother and her husband, type of family, type of habitat, monthly family income, eating habits, habits, spacing from previous pregnancy and obstetric status and cultural practices associated with childbearing processes in five practice areas such as dietary practices, religious practices, personal hygiene and care, activity and contraception and newborn care. Results : Majority 94 (52.22%) of mothers we're in the age group of 21-25 years, 175 (97.22%) of mothers were Hindu, 71 (39.44%) of mothers had higher secondary education, 66 (36.66%) of their husbands had higher secondary education, 151 (83.88%) of mothers were homemakers, 78 (43.33%) of their husbands were laborer on daily wages, 96 (53.33%) of mothers belonged to joint family, 160 (88.88%) of mothers were residing in rural area, 97 (53.88,%) of mothers were having monthly family income of 5001-10000, 173 (96.11%) of mothers were non-vegetarian, 176 (97.77%) of mothers had no bad habits, 107 (59.44%) of mothers had no spacing i.e. primipara with one living baby. According to practice areas, 46.33% of healthy cultural practices were observed in dietary practices area, 87.5% in religious practices area, 90.66% in personal hygiene and care area, 99.33% in activity and contraception area and 54.6% in newborn care area. 85.66% of unhealthy cultural practices were observed in dietary practices area, 95.22% in religious practices area, 96.5% in personal hygiene and care area and 41.54% in newborn care area. Overall 61.17% of healthy cultural practices and 72.17% of unhealthy cultural practices were observed among postnatal mothers during childbearing processes. High statistically significant association of cultural practices was observed with religion and significant association was observed with type of habitat and no significant association was observed with age, educational qualification, educational qualification of husbands, occupation, occupation of husbands, type of family, monthly family income, eating habits, habits, spacing from previous pregnancy and obstetric status. Conclusion: The present study revealed that majority 72.17% of the unhealthy cultural practices and 61.17% of healthy cultural practices were observed among the postnatal mothers irrespective of their age, educational qualification, educational qualification of husbands, occupation, occupation of husbands, type of family, monthly family income, eating habits, habits, spacing from previous pregnancy and obstetric status. Moreover the majority of mothers followed cultural practices associated with childbearing processes due to the pressure of their elderly family members for the sake of good health of the mother and baby.


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